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Naturalist Talk on Alligator Snapping Turtles

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Heard Natural Science Museum
1 Nature Place
McKinney, Texas 75069

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Alligator Snapping Turtle

 

Are alligator snapping turtles lurking near you?  Find out from an expert, Carl J. Franklin, herpetologist, biological curator and collections manager of the Amphibian and Reptile Diversity Research Center at the University of Texas Arlington.  Franklin will be the featured speaker at the next Texas Master Naturalist Blackland Prairie Chapter Naturalist Talk.   His presentation, entitled “Lurking Leviathans of DFW – Researching the Alligator Snapping Turtles in the Trinity River,” will focus on his encounters with these giant freshwater turtles.  In addition to his work with UT, Carl has worked at both the Fort Worth and Dallas Zoo Herpetology Departments; published two books about turtles; assisted with several wildlife documentary films pertaining to reptiles and amphibians; and conducted numerous herpetological collecting expeditions in the US, Latin America and Indonesia.   

The presentation will be on Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at the Heard Natural Science Museum, 1 Nature Place, McKinney TX 75069, in the Science Resource Center building.  A brief Chapter meeting will begin at 7:00 PM, followed by the Naturalist Talk.  This is a free event and non-members are invited to attend.  For directions to the Heard Museum visit www.bptmn.org.  For more information please email communications@bptmn.org.

The Blackland Prairie Chapter is one of 48 recognized Texas Master Naturalist chapters throughout the State.   Our chapter meets in McKinney Texas on the second Tuesday of each month and draws members from communities in Collin, Hunt, and Rockwall counties and adjacent areas.  The goal of the Texas Master Naturalist program is to provide an opportunity for concerned adult citizens of all ages to learn about the natural environment and use this knowledge to provide volunteer service in the form of community education, conservation, restoration, and demonstration projects.  The Texas Master Naturalist program began in 1998 as a joint effort between Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Services.


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